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Listerine discusses research regarding essential oils and biofilm kill

The lead researcher on a study of essential oils ingredients in Listerine Antiseptic mouth rinse shared additional details about the study with DentistryIQ.com.

Danette Ricci-Nittel, a microbiologist with the Johnson & Johnson Healthcare Products Division at McNEIL-PPC, Inc., discussed the results of the study, which was also presented at the March 2012 American Association for Dental Research (AADR) meeting.

The study’s data suggested that the essential oils found in Listerine Antiseptic mouthrinse accomplishes deeper penetration via live/dead stain and exhibits superior biofilm kill in the mouth vs. competitive mouth rinses that contain cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) or chlorhexadine (CHX).

The abstract of the study presented at the AADR meeting can be viewed here.

Ricci-Nittel told DentistryIQ.com, “In the first laboratory study, biofilm was grown statically for 48 hours. It was then subjected to a one, 30-second treatment rinse. The data from this assay showed that the essential oils found in Listerine Antiseptic exhibit deeper penetration via live/dead stain and superior biofilm kill in the mouth versus CPC and CHX.”

She added that a separate extended laboratory study consisted of biofilms grown under flow conditions.

“Biofilms were grown over 60 hours and were subjected to twice-daily treatments over the duration of those 60 hours (with five hours between treatments),” she said. “These results indicated that the essential oils found in Listerine Antiseptic exhibited deeper penetration via live/dead stain and biofilm kill to CPC and showed parity in biofilm penetration to CHX.”

In addition to the AADR presentation, the company also released a related video. Ricci-Nittel encouraged dental professionals to view the mechanism-of-action information.

“These lab studies demonstrate that Listerine Antiseptic is able to penetrate the plaque biofilm better than other mouthrinses, further supporting the mechanism of essential oils to control plaque and gingivitis,” she said.

She said the study utilized established visual methodology such as confocal laser microscopy.

“We were able to take it a step further in enhancing our messaging by designing and implementing new biofilm models through the evaluation of new dye combinations, both which improved stain ability and resolution and showed that Listerine Antiseptic exhibited deeper penetration.”

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Communicating shade to dental labs

Chris Salierno, DDS 12/04/2014

Dr. Salierno offers four practical tips that will help all dentists communicate more clearly with their dental labs for succes, and it invovles more effort than just writing a letter and a number on a lab script. I used to just wrtie “A2″ in a box on a lab sheet and hope that the lab would figure it out.  That was pretty dumb.

Unfortunately (or fortunately) our teeth are not identical to the VITA shade guide tabs.  There is far more complexity that exists in our dentin and enamel, so if we are to hope to acheive a higer level of replication we must put in some more effort than just writing a letter and a number on a lab script.

The good news is that you don’t need a masters degree in the fine arts to be able to take a good shade.  Here are some simple steps I use:

(1) Buy a damn digital SLR camera with flash and macro lens

I promise you that getting a professional camera will bring you to another level of dentistry.  There are a number of reasons, which our friend, Dr. Albert Yoo, is writing about in this month’s issue of Dental Economics.  But for now let’s be concerned with the fact that shade communication is far better with a proper camera set up than with your smart phone.  Two popular palces to get the whole package are Lester Dine and PhotoMed.

(2) Pick a few shades that look good

Don’t just pick one shade for your photo; pick a few.  Chances are that there’s more than one shade tab that will offer insight into the teeth of interest.  Giving more than one tab will also give the lab technician some variety and the ability to compare elements of color between photographs.  Don’t forget to give the lab a stump shade (shade of the prepared tooth) if you are using all-ceramic restorations.

(3) Take a proper photograph with the shade tab

Make sure the tab identifier is visable (e.g. A2, C4, etc).  Make sure the tab is held at a similar orientation as the teeth of interest so that the light plays off of it similarly.  Take a few photographs under different lights and not just your treatment room.

The orientation of the shade tab is a bit off, thus giving us a reflection that is not present on the teeth of interest.  This photo isn't terrible, but we lose an opportunity communicate some information to the lab.
The orientation of the shade tab is a bit off, thus giving us a reflection that is not present on the teeth of interest. This photo isn’t terrible, but we lose an opportunity communicate some information to the lab.

These photos are more accurate.  We have good orientation of the tabs, we can see the tab identifiers, and the lab has two photos for comparison.
These photos are more accurate. We have good orientation of the tabs, we can see the tab identifiers, and the lab has two photos for comparison.

(4) There’s more than just shade to communicate

But of course we’re not ONLY interested in communicating shade, are we?  There is also characterization and texture; what are the nuances of how the shade is distributed on the surfaces and what tiny lumps and bumps are to be found?  For these bits I like to take an extreme close-up photo, which can really only be done with a camera with a proper macro lens.  This can be separate from your shade tab photos so you’ll have a free hand to use a cool toy like a contrastor.

- See more at: http://thecuriousdentist.com/communicating-shade-to-labs/#sthash.iInTcl6F.dpuf 

Championship communication with your dental lab: Part III

David Rice, DDS 12/04/2014

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Artistry versus machine: Is artistry dying in dentistry and dental labs?

Craig A. Pickett, RG, CDT, TE 12/04/2014

Craig Pickett has watched the profession of dental lab technologist evolve through the years, and some of the changes haven't been for the best, including losing some of the artistry involved with restorations.

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