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Delcam offers DentMILL for Roland dental milling software

Delcam has introduced a new version of its DentMILL 2012 dental milling software tailored specifically for the production of crowns and bridges in zirconia, wax, and PMMA on the Roland DXW-50 desktop machining system. ‘DentMILL for Roland’ incorporates dedicated templates for the automated generation of three-axis and five-axis toolpaths specifically for the Roland equipment, together with libraries of proven tooling and fixturing.

DentMILL for Roland is based on Delcam’s PowerMILL CAM system for high-speed and five-axis machining, whose rapidly growing global sales have helped make the company the world’s leading specialist supplier of CAM software and services for the last 12 years. It is developed by the same development team as PowerMILL, the largest in the CAM industry.

DentMILL for Roland benefits from the many strengths of PowerMILL. These include a range of advanced strategies that offer smoother machining to give the best possible surface finish, plus flexible five-axis techniques that can produce even the most complex restorations quickly and accurately. 

DentMILL for Roland also includes all the major developments in the new DentMILL 2012 release.  These include the completely redesigned interface, with a reduced number of toolbars to allow the maximum screen space for toolpath generation and simulation together with bolder and clearer icons.  

The efficiency of material use is optimised with automatic nesting tools to position the various restorations within the block. In addition, the ability to apply part-to-part pinning is now available, which allows restorations to be nested more closely together.   

DentMILL for Roland also incorporates a materials stock-management system that allows the user only to select sizes of material block that are currently in stock. The software then selects the fixture appropriate for that block from the library supplied with the software, and applies automatically the shrinkage allowance and milling templates for the material.

While DentMILL for Roland can accept data from all the main dental CAD systems, it can be supplied with Delcam’s DentCAD design software as part of a complete dental CAD/CAM system. 

For more information, visit www.delcam.com.

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Chris Salierno, DDS 12/04/2014

Dr. Salierno offers four practical tips that will help all dentists communicate more clearly with their dental labs for succes, and it invovles more effort than just writing a letter and a number on a lab script. I used to just wrtie “A2″ in a box on a lab sheet and hope that the lab would figure it out.  That was pretty dumb.

Unfortunately (or fortunately) our teeth are not identical to the VITA shade guide tabs.  There is far more complexity that exists in our dentin and enamel, so if we are to hope to acheive a higer level of replication we must put in some more effort than just writing a letter and a number on a lab script.

The good news is that you don’t need a masters degree in the fine arts to be able to take a good shade.  Here are some simple steps I use:

(1) Buy a damn digital SLR camera with flash and macro lens

I promise you that getting a professional camera will bring you to another level of dentistry.  There are a number of reasons, which our friend, Dr. Albert Yoo, is writing about in this month’s issue of Dental Economics.  But for now let’s be concerned with the fact that shade communication is far better with a proper camera set up than with your smart phone.  Two popular palces to get the whole package are Lester Dine and PhotoMed.

(2) Pick a few shades that look good

Don’t just pick one shade for your photo; pick a few.  Chances are that there’s more than one shade tab that will offer insight into the teeth of interest.  Giving more than one tab will also give the lab technician some variety and the ability to compare elements of color between photographs.  Don’t forget to give the lab a stump shade (shade of the prepared tooth) if you are using all-ceramic restorations.

(3) Take a proper photograph with the shade tab

Make sure the tab identifier is visable (e.g. A2, C4, etc).  Make sure the tab is held at a similar orientation as the teeth of interest so that the light plays off of it similarly.  Take a few photographs under different lights and not just your treatment room.

The orientation of the shade tab is a bit off, thus giving us a reflection that is not present on the teeth of interest.  This photo isn't terrible, but we lose an opportunity communicate some information to the lab.
The orientation of the shade tab is a bit off, thus giving us a reflection that is not present on the teeth of interest. This photo isn’t terrible, but we lose an opportunity communicate some information to the lab.

These photos are more accurate.  We have good orientation of the tabs, we can see the tab identifiers, and the lab has two photos for comparison.
These photos are more accurate. We have good orientation of the tabs, we can see the tab identifiers, and the lab has two photos for comparison.

(4) There’s more than just shade to communicate

But of course we’re not ONLY interested in communicating shade, are we?  There is also characterization and texture; what are the nuances of how the shade is distributed on the surfaces and what tiny lumps and bumps are to be found?  For these bits I like to take an extreme close-up photo, which can really only be done with a camera with a proper macro lens.  This can be separate from your shade tab photos so you’ll have a free hand to use a cool toy like a contrastor.

- See more at: http://thecuriousdentist.com/communicating-shade-to-labs/#sthash.iInTcl6F.dpuf 

Championship communication with your dental lab: Part III

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Artistry versus machine: Is artistry dying in dentistry and dental labs?

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Craig Pickett has watched the profession of dental lab technologist evolve through the years, and some of the changes haven't been for the best, including losing some of the artistry involved with restorations.

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