Smiles don’t have expiration dates

Dr. Stacey Simmons, editorial director of Breakthrough Clinical, says, "When I got braces a year ago, I never considered myself as part of the 'older' population of adults who wants to get that perfect smile and correct a few minor occlusion issues. But when I interviewed Dr. Priscilla Larson, an orthodontist who treats a healthy number of older adults, I saw myself in each one of her answers. Bottom line—age is just a number."

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Dr. Stacey Simmons says, "When I got braces a year ago, I never considered myself as part of the 'older' population of adults who wants to get that perfect smile and correct a few minor occlusion issues. But when I interviewed Dr. Priscilla Larson, an orthodontist who treats a healthy number of older adults, I saw myself in each one of her answers. Bottom line—age is just a number."


Editor's note: This article first appeared in DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Find out more about it and subscribe here.

When I got braces a year ago, I never considered myself as part of the “older” population of adults who wants to get that perfect smile and correct a few minor occlusion issues that have been weighing on them for quite some time. But when I interviewed Dr. Priscilla Larson, an orthodontist who treats a healthy number of older adults, I saw myself in each one of her answers. Bottom line—age is just a number. So, if you have older patients who have been teetering on getting orthodontics, take a read because you are never too old to smile! Disclaimer: They say that 40 is the new 20, so I’m really not that old ...

It’s beneficial to have a reminder every now and then that we are not just “tooth” clinicians. The body and the oral cavity are connected; each can have an impact on the other's systems. The article this month on metabolic syndrome is a must-read. It emphasizes the things we can do to: 1. help diagnose the issue, and 2. better care for and educate our patients who have metabolic syndrome. The result? We have a more comprehensive approach to the care we render to our patients.

Whatever happened to that kiddo who had the big bump/bubble on his lip? Dr. Conway Jensen gives his follow-up on that pathology case. Sometimes what we want our patients to do and what they end up doing are two different things. Care to have a go at diagnosing the newest pathology submission? This white lesion could be anything ...

Enjoy and happy summer, friends!

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Stacey L. Simmons, DDS

Editorial Director, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS

LAST MONTH . . . Sometimes you can't put a price tag on dentistry

Editor's note: This article first appeared in DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Find out more about it and subscribe here.


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Staceylsimmonsdds 124x124Stacey L. Simmons, DDS, is in private practice in Hamilton, Montana. She is a graduate of Marquette University School of Dentistry. Dr. Simmons is a guest lecturer at the University of Montana in the Anatomy and Physiology Department. She is the editorial director of PennWell’s clinical dental specialties newsletter, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS, and a contributing author for DentistryIQ, Perio-Implant Advisory, and Dental Economics. Dr. Simmons can be reached at ssimmonsdds@gmail.com.


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