Changes in dental science and changes in us: how we can affect others for good

According to a recent study, the bacteria that live inside the mouth are known to change depending upon whether the host is well or in a diseased state. The intent of the research is to help people by developing biomarkers to predict diseases such as periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn’s disease.

Treeswithsunlight Vickicheeseman

We’re busy with the details of the day, but science continues to move forward.

The bacteria that live inside the mouth are known to change depending upon whether the host is well or in a diseased state. If the person is not well, the bacteria change to adapt, according to the latest research from scientists using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). (1) The study was published in the April 2014 issue of the journal mBio and led by Marvin Whiteley, professor of molecular biosciences and director of the Center for Infectious Disease at The University of Texas at Austin. (2) Read the abstract here.

Professor Whiteley indicated the intent of his research is to help people by developing biomarkers to predict diseases such as periodontitis,diabetes, and Crohn’s disease. The key will be to provide preventive measures to patients to protect them from getting sick. Ultimately, the goal may be to manipulate the bacteria in a way that they could be “rewired” to health. (1)

Treeswithsunlight Vickicheeseman In other news this week, Robin Williams died. No one knows all of the details, but all over the world our hearts were broken. A man who made many smile shouldered burdens by himself. If only some things had been different, we think. But inside each of us, we do have the ability to change things for the better … bacteria change depending upon the environment; so can we. We can offer smiles like Robin did. Dental professionals are in a prime position to do that one person at a time.

The boundaries of science are being broadened every day. Let’s open up our boundaries a little bit too.

ADDITIONAL READING |Speak for Yourself to Grow your Dental Practice: Three lessons Robin Williams taught dental pros

Vickicheeseman2014Vicki Cheeseman is an associate editor in PennWell’s Dental Division. She edits for DentistryIQ.com, Surgical-Restorative Resource, Dental Economics, DE’s ENDO File, Bracing for Success, and RDH. Follow her on Twitter @vlcheeseman or contact her by email at vickic@pennwell.com.

References
1. Mouth bacteria can change its diet, supercomputers reveal. ScienceDaily. Aug. 12, 2014. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140812163810.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_health+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Health+News%29
2. Jorth P, Turner KH, Gumus P, Nizam N, Buduneli N, Whiteley M. Metatranscriptomics of the human oral microbiome during health and disease. mBio, 2014; 5(2):e01012-14 DOI: 10.1128/mBio.01012-14.

More in Oral-systemic Health