BC oral pathology case No. 38: The 'harmless-looking' white lip lesion that got ignored

In this oral pathology case, a healthy 65-year-old male patient of record presents for his recare/periodontal maintenance visit. He reports no concerns, but a clinical head and neck exam reveals a white, flat, 5 mm x 5 mm irregular-bordered lesion on the lower labial tissue. Based on the presentation and clinical exam, can you diagnose this lesion?

Sep 19th, 2018
Content Dam Diq Online Articles 2018 09 18sept27bcpath38t
In this oral pathology case, a healthy 65-year-old male patient of record presents for his recare/periodontal maintenance visit. He reports no concerns, but a clinical head and neck exam reveals a white, flat, 5 mm x 5 mm irregular-bordered lesion on the lower labial tissue. Based on the presentation and clinical exam, can you diagnose this lesion?

Presentation and clinical exam

A healthy 65-year-old male patient of record for several years presents for his recare/periodontal maintenance visit. He reports no concerns. A clinical head and neck exam reveals a white, flat, 5 mm x 5 mm irregular-bordered lesion on the lower labial tissue (figures 1-3).

The lesion had been present for approximately two months, but the patient did not remember experiencing any trauma to the area. Specific etiology for the lesion is unknown. The area is not tender to palpation, and, for the most part, the patient has ignored the lesion.


Figure 1


Figure 2


Figure 3


What are your differentials and recommended course of treatment for this patient?

Find the diagnosis and complete analysis here.

CALL FOR PATHOLOGY CASES

Do you have an interesting oral pathology case you would like to share with Breakthrough’s readers? If so, submit a clinical radiograph or high-resolution photograph, a patient history, diagnosis, and treatment rendered to DEbreakthrough@pennwell.com.

Editor's note:

This article first appeared in Breakthrough Clinical, a clinical specialties newsletter. Browse our newsletter archives to find out more and subscribe here.

For each case, Breakthrough Clinical readers are invited to send their answers to DEbreakthrough@pennwell.com. The final diagnosis and recommended treatment appear in the following month's newsletter.

For more oral pathology articles, click here.



Stacey L. Simmons, DDS, is in private practice in Hamilton, Montana. She is a graduate of Marquette University School of Dentistry. Dr. Simmons is a guest lecturer at the University of Montana in the Anatomy and Physiology Department. She is the editorial director of PennWell’s clinical dental specialties newsletter, Breakthrough Clinical,and a contributing author for DentistryIQ, Perio-Implant Advisory, and Dental Economics. Dr. Simmons can be reached at ssimmonsdds@gmail.com.


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