Never stop learning, because life never stops teaching

Breakthrough Clinical’s Editorial Director Dr. Stacey Simmons says now that the holidays are over and, presumably most of us have sated our excitement over the Star Wars mayhem, we’ve hopefully had time to reflect upon last year’s clinical and practice management successes and ruminate on those things that we could improve on. Epictetus said, “No great thing is created suddenly,” which is why we must keep moving forward and improve our abilities as dentists—from all angles of the provider spectrum. To build on this thought, she asks readers to answer four questions. Don’t worry, though, if you don’t know the answers; it’s an open book test. Read the articles in this month’s issue of the newsletter, and we can all learn together.

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This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

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"I'm not always in my office! Here I am with my dad snowshoeing under Montana's Big Sky."

It’s January, which means back to the grind. The holidays are over and, presumably, for most of us, we’ve sated our excitement over the Star Wars mayhem. Along with all of that, we’ve hopefully reflected upon last year’s dental clinical and practice management successes, and furthermore ruminated on those things that we could improve on.

Epictetus said, “No great thing is created suddenly,” which is why we must keep moving forward with improving our abilities as dentists—from all angles of the provider spectrum. So, to build on this thought, let’s see what your answers are to these questions:

  1. Where should the gutta-percha point actually end for optimal endodontic success?

  2. 12 mm overjet, 100% overbite, and Mom says “no” to orthognathic surgery and extracting the premolars. Is there an alternative that does not involve surgery to achieve that sought-after smile?

  3. Why in the world didn’t that patient schedule the work to be done, especially after you took all that time to discuss his or her needs?

  4. This lesion is white, it’s under the tongue, and it doesn’t hurt. What would you do?

Stumped or curious? Read up, my friends. This is good stuff written by your colleagues who face the same things you and I do every day as dentists. You may be surprised at what you learn. I know I always am!

As always, thanks and cheers!

Staceysimmonsdds Small Signature

Stacey L. Simmons, DDS
Editorial Director, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS

Editor’s note: The title quote was written by an unknown source.

This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

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