Archaeologists uncover ancient skeleton with teeth embedded in a pelvic tumor

Archaeologists working at the site of La Fogonussa near Lleida, in Spain, have discovered a female skeleton with four deformed teeth embedded within a tumor in the pelvis. This is the first time scientists have found this type of teratoma in the ancient world.

Archaeologists working at the site of La Fogonussa near Lleida, in Spain, have discovered a female skeleton with four deformed teeth embedded within a tumor in the pelvis. Researchers reported that two of the teeth were still attached to the wall of the tumor.

RELATED |The oddest dental stories of 2012

RELATED |Surgeons find two teeth embedded in a tumor of the eye

The Roman woman, who died approximately 1,600 years ago, had a condition known as an ovarian teratoma. The word teratoma comes from the Greek words "teras" and "onkoma," which translate to "monster" and "swelling," respectively.

Such tumors come from germ cells, which form human eggs and can create hair, teeth, and bone, among other structures.

This is the first time scientists have found this type of teratoma in the ancient world.

Click here to read the article from LiveScience.

RELATED |Researchers uncover new evidence of ancient dentistry

More in Oral Cancer