SOS Diet author comments on CDC study about added sugars

James Surrell, MD, the author of “SOS (Stop Only Sugar) Diet,” recently commented on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conclusion that lowering the intake of added sugars can be life-saving to consumers.

Drjamesurrell

Dr. James Surrell

James Surrell, MD, the author of “SOS (Stop Only Sugar) Diet,” recently commented on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conclusion that lowering the intake of added sugars can be life-saving to consumers.

“I always advise my patients, medical colleagues, family and friends, and just about everybody I meet to avoid these added sugars,” said Dr. Surrell, a board certified colon and rectal surgeon. “There is way too much sugar added to our food and drinks available today, including non-diet soft drinks, candy, cookies, cakes, fruit drinks, and many other items as well. Read all labels and avoid high sugar. As scientifically noted by the CDC and AMA, these added sugars are very, very unhealthy.”

The study released by the CDC establishes that consuming too much added sugar (refined sugar) found in regular soda, cakes, cookies, and candies significantly increases the risk of death from heart disease. Dr. Surrell is a proponent of reducing added sugar in diets to lose weight and improve health.

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The CDC’s lead author on the study, Quanhe Yang, a senior scientist with the CDC, said, "The risk of cardiovascular disease death increases exponentially as you increase your consumption of added sugar."

Yang and his research team reviewed data from more than 31,000 people who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which evaluates dietary habits based on in-person interviews.

Among Yang’s findings, published online on February 3, 2014, by the Journal of the American Medical Association, are that:

• People who consumed more than 21 percent of daily calories from added sugar had double the risk of death from heart disease as those who consumed less than 10 percent of calories from added sugars.

• A person on a 2,000-calorie diet who consumes 21 percent of their daily calories from added sugar would be eating 420 calories from added sugar, which would be roughly three cans of regular soda a day.

• People who consumed seven or more servings a week of sugar-sweetened beverages were at a 29% higher risk of death from heart disease than those who consumed one serving or less.

Dr. Surrell, during his 20-year plus career as a colon surgeon, claims that individuals who follow the short and simple SOS Diet plan of low sugar, high fiber can lose five to eight pounds per month.

“To lose weight and keep it off what you need to do is become a label reading detective,” stresses Dr. Surrell. “And that is really all that is required. With a little practice you will learn to identify healthy and unhealthy foods and drinks by identifying low sugar and high fiber. You will be so much healthier and it will change your life forever!”

Dr. Surrell holds fellowship status in the American College of Surgeons and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Dr. Surrell wrote the regional best-selling book SOS (Stop Only Sugar) Diet book, which has sold more than 20,000 copies. Each year he gives 50 talks to thousands of professionals and people of all walks of life on nutrition, weight loss, and healthy lifestyles.

Sosdietbookcover

His book is available on Amazon.com in both paperback and as a Kindle edition. It is also available as a Nook book from Barnes and Noble and at local book stores.

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