Payraise1
Payraise1
Payraise1
Payraise1
Payraise1

The timing of pay raises in dental hygiene

June 10, 2013
Dental hygienists who work full time and in one office setting are more likely to receive a pay raise, according to a survey conducted by RDH eVillage.

Dental hygienists who work full time and in one office setting are more likely to receive a pay raise, according to a survey conducted by RDH eVillage.

The survey asked dental hygienists about when they last received a pay raise. Overall, the national results indicated:

  1. 42% have not received a raise for more than five years
  2. 32% received a raise more than a year ago
  3. 14% received a raise within the past 12 months
  4. 9% have never received a raise
  5. 3% said the question was not applicable to them since they have not worked at current employer long enough to discuss a raise.

Hygienists who work full time enjoy a clear advantage over part-time hygienists. Among the hygienists who have not received a raise in more than five years, 47% of them work three days a week or less. In comparison, only 39% of hygienists who four days a week or more have not received a raise in five years.

Hygienists who work four days or more a week were more likely to be among those receiving a raise within the last 12 months (17%). In comparison, 10% of hygienists who work three days or fewer received a raise within the last 12 months.

In addition, 52% of dental hygienists who work in three or more dental offices have not received a raise in more than five years (compared to 40% of hygienists who work in one office).

Experience doesn’t count, apparently

Fifty percent of hygienists who have been practicing for than 20 years have not received a raise in more than five years. In comparison, 22% of hygienists who have been practicing for less than 10 years have received a raise within the last 12 months. In addition 17% of hygienists practicing for 10 to 20 years have received a raise within the last 12 months. Both percentages for the less experienced dental hygiene professional is higher than the national average cited above.

The value of a bachelor’s vs. associates degree

When it comes to pay raises, the degree earned by the dental hygienist is not a critical factor.

It pays to be out in the country

The survey also asked if hygienists practice in a “metropolitan area including suburbs” or in a “small town or rural” area. Pay raises do favor dental hygienists who are based in less populated areas.