Turning over a new leaf with hands-free dental suction

Patti Maragliano, RDH, BSDH, thought she was satisfied with her traditional saliva ejector. Then she tried ReLeaf, a hands-free dental suction device that has helped her complete procedures more quickly and has been popular with her patients.

Mar 20th, 2017
Content Dam Diq Online Articles 2017 03 Releaf Dental Suction

Patti Maragliano, RDH, BSDH, thought she was satisfied with her traditional saliva ejector. Then she tried ReLeaf, a hands-free dental suction device that has helped her complete procedures more quickly and has been popular with her patients.

The ReLeaf hands-free dental suction is a dental innovation you should try. When I first looked into the ReLeaf system, I was not exactly sure how it was going to work. After watching the instructional videos on the website, I discovered that the system is easy to install, and placing the suction seemed logical, so I decided to give it a try.

The suction kit contains the soft green leaf, a quick-connect adapter, and a hose. The hose connects to the high-volume evacuation (HVE), and the quick-connect adapter connects the green leaf to the tubing. The leaf is disposable, and the tubing can be disinfected just like evacuation tubing. The tubing is also autoclavable, which I find to be an added benefit.

The green leaf is made of a soft, BPA-free polymer, and it is very comfortable for the patient. ReLeaf gently rests against the cheek, and the tapered shape fits perfectly in the vestibule. Since the leaf fits up against the cheek, the clinician’s field of view is clear. I find it easier to retract the patient’s cheek with the mirror while scaling, polishing, and placing sealants. Whether you are placing sealants or using an ultrasonic scaler, the ReLeaf hands-free dental suction maintains a dry field. Since it uses the HVE, there is very little pooling of saliva or water during procedures. If a patient does feel a need to expectorate, I find if they bite just slightly, the leaf seems to open more and completely evacuates any fluid that might have accumulated.

Patients have told me they feel more comfortable using the ReLeaf compared to traditional saliva ejectors. One comment I have received from patients is that they think the ReLeaf stays in place better, eliminating the need to hold the suction. Patients have also shared that the leaf doesn't get stuck to the cheek or tongue. They have an easier time communicating with me during treatment because they can talk with the suction in place. Since I am able to leave the suction in place for the whole procedure, appointments are completed faster and more effectively.

For 22 years, I used a traditional saliva ejector. I was satisfied with my own unique way of bending the saliva ejector into the perfect shape to provide evacuation during my procedures. Until trying the ReLeaf hands-free dental suction, I thought I was happy using traditional saliva ejectors. I never thought this cute little leaf would be so effective. Hygienists will really benefit from "turning over a new leaf"and giving the ReLeaf a try. You will be so pleased with the positive effects this suction will have on your procedures and with the feedback you will receive from your patients.


Editor's note: This article first appeared in Pearls for Your Practice: The Product Navigator.Click here to subscribe. Click here to submit a products article for consideration.


Patti Maragliano, RDH, BSDH, is a dental hygienist with more than 20 years of experience. She holds an adjunct clinical faculty position in the dental hygiene program at SUNY Orange in Middletown, New York, and she treats patients in a prosthodontic practice in Wappinger Falls, New York. She is passionate and committed to the dental hygiene profession, loves working with students, and is also the vice president of the Mid-Hudson Dental Hygienists’ Association. Patti is currently pursuing a master’s degree at Saint Francis University in Loretto, Pennsylvania, and obtained her bachelor’s degree at the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists and Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.


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