Expanding your vision to 'see' new growth opportunities

Dr. Stacey Simmons, editorial director of DE’s Breakthrough Clinical, says our tendency to become creatures of habit will often dull our ability to “see” things and subsequently seize upon an opportunity to improve the status quo or look for different ways to treat our patients. Going into a situation with our eyes wide open will give us an opportunity to reset our normal. We have to be willing to go beyond our limits and often our comfort zone to make something work; this is especially true in today’s world of dentistry.

Jul 1st, 2015
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This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

“Normal is what you make it. Our mind creates limits around what is normal.” ~ Joe De Sena

How many times have you seen something and then, suddenly, you actually “see” it for the first time for what it really is? That’s exactly what I thought when I took this picture. I’ve seen many implants placed, but this was the first time I was actually able to see the initiation of the relationship between the implant and biological tissues upon placement. I gained a new respect for the integration process, because so much of what I do on the restorative end stems from that very first step.

Dentistry is just like that—our tendency to become creatures of habit will oft times dull our ability to “see” things and subsequently seize upon an opportunity to improve the status quo or look for different ways to treat our patients.

For instance, removable partial dentures are frustrating for dentist and patient alike, but what if you used implants to help retain them? Dr. John Hodges shows us how we can make our patients happier in his article titled “Claspless, removable partial dentures using implant-supported Locator attachments.”

Is surgery the only way to treat an anterior open bite, or is there an alternative? Orthodontist Padraig Dennehy, DMD, illustrates a fascinating, noninvasive option to treat anterior open bites using Temporary Anchorage Devices (TAD) in his article, “Temporary Anchorage Device (TAD) use in the treatment of anterior open bite.”

Getting voids and inaccurate placement of your gutta-percha points with your root canals? Dr. Musikant, an endodontist, gives suggestions and advice on how you can improve your technique in his article titled “Three-dimensional endodontic obturation the safest and easiest way possible.”

Going into a situation with your eyes wide open will give you an opportunity to reset your normal. We have to be willing to go beyond our limits and often our comfort zone to make something work; this is especially true in today’s world of dentistry. Why not try it? Besides, what have you got to lose?

Thanks, enjoy, and have a fantastic 4th of July!

Stacey L. Simmons, DDS
Editor,
DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS

This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

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