Triathlons and dentistry: How your effort can be a measure of success

Dr. Stacey Simmons, editorial director of DE’s Breakthrough Clinical, introduces the original articles for the month and compares dentistry to a triathlon. She explains how we may be good at what we do, but we always have an opportunity to do it better. She says, “If we defined success based on results alone, our impression and satiety of that accomplishment would not reach its full potential. So join me, and together we can swim a little faster, bike a little longer, and run a little farther. Without a doubt, we’d make one hell of an amazing team!”

May 6th, 2015
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This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

“In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results. The strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
~ James Allen

I love triathlons. The physical and mental challenges of the sport are addicting, especially when my fiercest competition is myself. I have found that if I keep my training simple, my ability to swim a little faster, bike up that hill with an oh-so-intense burn in my legs, and run a bit farther is a challenge I can rise up to. On race day (or even when I’m training for that matter) I don’t measure my results based on a clock or who passed who; rather, if I gave it my all, then I am satisfied. And that’s the beauty of it.

Dentistry is no different. How? Because even though we may be good at what we do, we always have an opportunity to do it better. Suppose you follow a certain periodontal treatment protocol—will your results be better with or without the use of locally delivered antibiotics? Dr. John Remien gives a recap on the use of this medication when it is most effective with comprehensive periodontal treatment planning. Click here to read “Thoughtful use of local delivery antimicrobial agents in periodontitis.”

What about that patient with missing lateral incisors? If a flipper is your panacea for replacement, even as a temporary, then Dr. Jim Schmidt has some alternative suggestions for you to consider. Click here to read “Treatment considerations for the congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisor.”

Do you have challenges with the cleaning and shaping of some of your root canals? Dr. Barry Musikant has recommendations on how you can improve your technique using a multidimensional approach. Click here to read “Endodontic insight into safety, efficiency, and cost savings.”

If we defined success based on results alone, our impression and satiety of that accomplishment would not reach its full potential. So join me, and together we can swim a little faster, bike a little longer, and run a little farther. Without a doubt, we’d make one hell of an amazing team!

Enjoy!

Stacey L. Simmons, DDS
Editor, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS

This article first appeared in the newsletter, DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Subscribe here.

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