Implants aren't for everyone, and yes, I'd like to obturate like an endodontist!

In her editor's note for Breakthrough Clinical, Dr. Stacey Simmons says she admires the capacity that dental implants have to restore function and esthetics for patients who have lost one or more teeth. But that aren't for everyone; you'll find out why. She also says that as a general dentist, she doesn't like doing root canals very much, so education is key for effectively completing endodontics procedures with more confidence each time.

Nov 1st, 2017
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In her editor's note for Breakthrough Clinical, Dr. Stacey Simmons says she admires the capacity that dental implants have to restore function and esthetics for patients who have lost one or more teeth. But they aren't for everyone; you'll find out why. She also says that as a general dentist, she doesn't like doing root canals very much, so education is key for effectively completing endodontics procedures with more confidence each time.


Editor's note: This article first appeared in DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Find out more about the clinical specialties newsletter created just for dentists, and subscribe here.

THE MORE I WORK WITH DENTAL IMPLANTS, THE MORE I ADMIRE THEIR CAPACITY to restore function, esthetics, and provide an alternative replacement option for patients who have lost one or more teeth. Despite my enthusiasm, though, there are factors that must be considered when treatment planning for implants, as they are not immune to the challenges the oral cavity presents to us.

Photo by John A. Hodges, DDS, FICOI


Full-mouth reconstruction with the All-On-4 (AO4)—or fixed implant bridges—is no exception, which is why I am especially excited about the article that Dr. John Hodges wrote this month. His article addresses valid points that you, as a provider, absolutely must discuss with your patient prior to proceeding with this restorative option. Is the AO4 for everyone? No. However, with proper education and guidance, it can be exactly right for some patients.

I suppose that over time, through experience, and armed with education, eventually I could be able to do root canals like an endodontist. As a general dentist (and someone who doesn’t like doing root canals all that much), education has been key for me to effectively complete these procedures with a bit more confidence each time I see one on my schedule. With that being said, would you like to learn how to obturate like an endodontist? I sure would! Read up, my friends ... the article by Dr. L. Stephen Buchanan on obturation is a good one. It will definitely boost your skill level and understanding of this vital step in the process of performing root canals.

This month’s pathology case will definitely require you to put your thinking cap on. It has taken a multitude of twists and turns from the get-go. From this presentation, it will be difficult to assess exactly which direction the case finally went; however, it shows that even the simplest of pathological presentations can lead to some of the most complicated treatment outcomes.

Cheers!

Stacey L. Simmons, DDS
Editorial Director, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS

LAST MONTH . . . Saving lives and improving the overall health of our patients

Editor's note: This article first appeared in DE's Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS. Find out more about the clinical specialties newsletter created just for dentists, and subscribe here.


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Stacey L. Simmons, DDS, is in private practice in Hamilton, Montana. She is a graduate of Marquette University School of Dentistry. Dr. Simmons is a guest lecturer at the University of Montana in the Anatomy and Physiology Department. She is the editorial director of PennWell’s clinical dental specialties newsletter, DE’s Breakthrough Clinical with Stacey Simmons, DDS, and a contributing author for DentistryIQ, Perio-Implant Advisory, and Dental Economics. Dr. Simmons can be reached at ssimmonsdds@gmail.com.


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